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Hey BTG, I'm afraid I'm kind of a gun nut. I'm unfortunate enough to live in Australia and as such my actual experience with guns is null and void.

 

With your Ruger, how accurate would you call the gun? By that, I mean would you be confident in shooting it out to thirty metres and hitting the target? Are the sights on your Ruger sighted properly? Basically, any and everything about the gun that isn't technical is what I'm interested in.

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With your Ruger, how accurate would you call the gun? By that, I mean would you be confident in shooting it out to thirty metres and hitting the target? Are the sights on your Ruger sighted properly? Basically, any and everything about the gun that isn't technical is what I'm interested in.

The gun is a compact, very accurate for it's class. Maximum range I would feel comfortable defending at would be 15m. (but if pressured, would be capable to 35-40m) The sights on it broke, don't know how or why, it's not typical. (that's why I added a laser sight)

Very reliable...

dLoXxu-uUE0

Least recoil of any .40 S&W handgun that I (and many others) can find.

Requires a thorough cleaning before first use. (including the striker, or you can get anything from light strikes to failure to fire)

Doesn't wear out easily. (seen plenty of reviews from reliable sources saying that 50,000 rounds through their gun with regular maintenance doesn't cause any apparent wear)

Lots of ammo, or a smaller more concealable size magazine. (15 round mag, same number of rounds as the SR9 or the SR40 non-compact, or 9 round mag for a smaller profile/lighter gun)

Striker fired pistol, not hammer. (cock it by racking the slide, nothing else ill cock the weapon)

Has a short Picatinny rail under the barrel, so you can mount a laser or flashlight or something else easily. (I was thinking about seeing if I could fit a foregrip on it, just for the lols)

Very light weight. (23.4 oz)

 

If you wanna know something 'boot guns and you don't want to read,than this channel is for you: http://www.youtube.com/user/hickok45?feature=g-subs-u

His review of the SR40c T&E was part of the reason I chose the gun. :)

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I haven't had the time to check out the videos, but why haven't you chosen to pick up a Glock or any of the more... for lack of a better word mainstream handguns?

 

from what I've seen and read, most military-special forces types prefer Heckler and Koch handguns, like the 9mm version of the USP Compact, have you had any experience firing a heckler or any SIG-Sauers?

 

Do you concealed-carry it?

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If I had the money, I would have tried a Glock as well... Unemployment generally makes spending $900+ on a handgun infeasible. (I payed $600 for my Ruger, and it's better than the Glock/SIG version according to all the reviews I've read)

 

Yes, most military guys get the SIGs and a few get Glocks, but that's mainly because the companies have government contracts making them extremely cheap, and because the Glocks and SIGs available to the military are different from the civilian guns with the same name. (Ruger doesn't have any government contracts, and they only produce civilian guns)

 

Yes, I conceal carry. I also open carry when I'm out and about. (I don't have a concealed holster yet, so I just stick it in a pocket)

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Me personally, I wouldn't ever take an M-16 over an AK, just because I prefer reliable firearms over almost everything else. (basic functionality for the desired purpose, then reliability, then quality of construction) I just can't get over the issues they had with the original M-16's in Vietnam; the soldiers had to keep 2 rounds less in their magazines just to keep it from jamming all the time.

With all due respect the issue of reliability in the m16 is vastly overstated. Mine worked like an absolute champion back in 07 and I think I cleaned it once. This is in addition to having absolutely terrible magazines, which are the primary reason for failure in almost any autoloader.

 

Oh and hi, I'm new, obviously.

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Yeah, the newer versions (M16A4 etc.) have gotten rid of the vast majority of the problems they used to have, but they still aren't anywhere near as reliable as thew AK47. (I'd like to see you fire an M16 with any significant amount of rust on/in it)

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I've never personally fired a firearm. I've owned a BB rifle and an airsoft M4 replica. However, I have a very strong attraction to Bolt Action Rifles. No other Infantry rifle can boast the sheer power and precision of one. I get really excited every time I see the sniping scene from Hurt Locker. The sheer size of a. 50 caliber bullet is impressive, and all the strength it carries when it hits its target generally just causes it to explode. That's really the jist of what I've got to say.

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You really should give it a try... Some shooting ranges have rentable guns. There's no feeling quite like holding that kind of power in your hands.

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Living in a run down trailer with an overweight alcoholic wife, 3 kids and a pick-up truck? What does that have to do with guns?

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I said dream, not reality.

 

Also, I've got a question that I've been meaning to ask for a while. Can somebody please explain the difference between an Assault Rifle and a Carbine Rifle to me. That's always confused me...

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There's always a lot of confusion about the differences because the answer is that there is no universal standard.

 

Every gun designer, manufacturer and military from the mid-1800 until the mid 1900s had a slightly different definition of carbine, and this creates today's confusion.

 

This is the period of the Industrial Revolution, when nearly every couple of years the technology of gun design and manufacturing jumped forward by great advances.

 

Early Rifles, since their invention as an improvement over muskets, needed to be long for several reasons.

 

One, the black gun powder they used was not very powerful so the barrel needed to be long to give the projectile time to get up some good speed from the charge.

 

Two, a shooter can be more accurate with a longer 'sight plane'..... the distance between the front and rear sights on a rifle. The longer the sight plane, the easier it is to aim at a target at distance.

 

This is one of the reasons the Americans won the Revolution over the British, as the Americans typically used very long Kentucky or Pennsylvania rifles that could kill a man at 200 or even 300 yards while the Brits and their German mercenaries had European short muskets and rifles, which did not have the same range or accuracy and were not good over 100 yards.

 

Lastly, as an infantry weapon, early rifles doubled as a stabbing weapon with bayonet. During the Napoleonic Wars, more men died of bayonets than gunshots, due to the time needed to reload.

Having a three foot long lance was a big disadvantage if the guy on the other side had a five foot long one!

 

Long rifles naturally have some drawbacks. They can be cumbersome and heavy.

 

Mounted Calvary were the first to demand shorter and lighter rifles. As these "Calvary carbines" were developed, different countries called them either carbines or 'short rifles'. There was no consistency, it was a terminology preference that varied by language. These were usually in the same caliber as their rifle counterparts. There were soon issued to artillerymen, engineers and wagon and truck drivers, as the smaller weapon suited their needs better than an infantry rifle.

 

Around the turn of the 18th into 19th century, bullet technology made leaps forward with high-powered smokeless powders and jacketed, spitzer bullets that flew faster and longer. This made the need for a very long rifle obsolete, so rifles became shorter.

 

The uniquely-American Old-West lever action rifles sometimes were called carbines, often for the short-barreled versions. These were "horse-guns" as they were made to be carried in a scabbard by cowboys and the like.

 

For the Americans, the Spanish War of 1898 was a decisive event in rifles. The U.S. had superior ships and technology and resources and manpower except in one critical area, the soldier's rifle. The Spaniards had German-designed Mauser rifles firing smokeless powder while the Americans had Norwegian-designed black powder rifles called a Krag-Jorgensen. The Mauser was such a superior rifle that many US soldiers gladly tossed away their issued Krag rifles for a captured Mauser.

 

The US first tried to license the Mauser for their next rifle, but decided to just copy the design almost exactly at the Army's Springfield Armory. The result was the 1903 Springfield, which was in service through the Vietnam War era. This "rifle" by any account of the day was actually a carbine, but never called a carbine.

 

Around this time the British developed the SMLE (Short rifle, Magazine fed, Lee-Enfield), which was a medium-length rifle that served as a compromise between rifle and carbine. They wanted one weapon for all purposes, to make logistics easier.

 

All industrialized countries went this route, with the difference between carbine and rifle became more blurred.

 

The next confusion that comes about is the development of a weapon to replace the pistol and revolver for rear-guard and support soldiers. What became the M1 Carbine bore almost no relation to the M1 Garand rifle, although many Americans think the Carbine is the baby brother of the Garand. It's actually not even a Carbine, because it shoots an underpowered pistol round that is completely inappropriate for a combat soldier. Still, the US GI loved the lightweight "long pistol" and the word carbine gets even more confusing.

 

The same thing has been going on since, with the term "Carbine" used for a weapon generally shorter than something else called a rifle. The M16, by traditional standards, is a carbine. Legendary gun writer and guru Jeff Cooper considered them as such. Just about any modern "assault rifle" is actually a carbine.

 

So the word's meaning has changed and continues to change. Sorry for going on so long, you asked a question that I have pondered and researched for years.........

Hope that answers your question.

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Wow, that was awesome BTG. I feel, like, educated right now. Feels good man. Thank you much!

 

New question. More of a poll than anything.

 

A lot of people interested in using a firearm for personal defense invest in a Pepper-box rather than a traditional pistol. Do you think that a Pepper-box is "overdoing it?" It could cause much more destructive injuries to people than a traditional low caliber bullet, plus it requires less accuracy, making it possible for someone without training to steal the gun and still do considerable harm.

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Pepper-box style weapons have generally gone out of style for a simple reason... It's easier to get a Judge and fire .410 shot shell than it is to put 4 of any pistol round in a single-shot weapon. Same recoil, damage, range, and spread too.

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If someone can answer this question for me, I'd appreciate it.

 

How many rounds does an MP5 usually carry? I ask because I want to know how accurate Hal-Life's 50 rounds a clip is.

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if it was possible I would love to own Level V Body Armor, I would want someone to punch me and break every bone in their arm and basically never be able to either shake a hand or ever touch anyone with that hand again and basically be screwed for some time

 

 

I know that I just bought some Surplus BB guns that were faker than sin, one was a realistic looking CO2 compressed H&K USP .45 and well I went with it since I wanted to look a slightly bit sinister with it

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So long as you live in the US, are not a felon, and don't live in Connecticut, you should be able to buy any level of body armor that you want. Not sure about eod suits, they might be legal too.

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