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World Youth Day 2016 pictures

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Thank you for sharing this, BTG. Hope the trip went well.

"Ross, this is nothing. WHAT YOU NEED to be playing is S***flinger 5000." - Ross Scott talking about himself.

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PM me if you have any questions or concerns! :D

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Looks wonderful. My mom's been following the event through EWTN. Your pictures of Auschwitz brought shivers in my spine just looking at them.

Welp, now what?

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So you got around to posting them :D Was a trip you organized yourself or did you go as part of a youth club or something? I have a mild interest in crucifixion art and I'm curious to know which church this sculpture is housed in, and who created it. Any help you could offer BTG would be appreciated.

 

Your pictures of Auschwitz brought shivers in my spine just looking at them.

It's shocking how mundane the spaces look. I never know what it is we are expecting to see in a place with a reputation as starkly evil as preserved concentration camp, I think I'm much more used to seeing those cramped quarters in over-reproduced grainy contemporaneous photographs inhabited by the emaciated inmates and victims. Seeing them in a modern photograph outside of that context is alienating and haunting.

When close friends speak ill of close friends

they pass their abuse from ear to ear

in dying whispers -

even now, when prayers are no longer prayed.

What sounds like violent coughing

turns out to be laughter.

Shuntarō Tanikawa

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Pardon my ignorance, but what does the World Youth day entail?

 

Just a gathering of Catholic youth, a bit like a pilgrimage in a way.

 

It's shocking how mundane the spaces look. I never know what it is we are expecting to see in a place with a reputation as starkly evil as preserved concentration camp, I think I'm much more used to seeing those cramped quarters in over-reproduced grainy contemporaneous photographs inhabited by the emaciated inmates and victims. Seeing them in a modern photograph outside of that context is alienating and haunting.

 

You could just faintly see the emaciated victims and the SS guards just by looking at the empty spaces of the camp, like you were momentarily brought back in time. It adds to the eeriness of the place.

Welp, now what?

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So you got around to posting them :D Was a trip you organized yourself or did you go as part of a youth club or something? I have a mild interest in crucifixion art and I'm curious to know which church this sculpture is housed in, and who created it. Any help you could offer BTG would be appreciated.

It was in a church that was converted to a shrine dedicated to St. John Paul II in Poland... Unfortunately, I never did get the name of the place memorized.

 

No, I was not solo, this was a part of the Neocatechumenal Way, (don't bother looking it up online, the internet doesn't know shit about it; it's basically a return to doing many things the way the early Christians did, back when it was illegal to be a Christian almost everywhere) and there were 300 people from Colorado in my group.

 

You could just faintly see the emaciated victims and the SS guards just by looking at the empty spaces of the camp, like you were momentarily brought back in time. It adds to the eeriness of the place.

You saw the picture with the pond and the 4 gravestones in front? That pond still holds some of the ashes of the people that died there. Ashes used to cover the entire place like a thick snow. And that trench full of stagnant water... That was where they piled the bodies before incineration.

bi ti ʤi ˈbulzaɪ

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It was in a church that was converted to a shrine dedicated to St. John Paul II in Poland... Unfortunately, I never did get the name of the place memorized.

 

No, I was not solo, this was a part of the Neocatechumenal Way, (don't bother looking it up online, the internet doesn't know shit about it; it's basically a return to doing many things the way the early Christians did, back when it was illegal to be a Christian almost everywhere) and there were 300 people from Colorado in my group.

That's a pity. In Walsall's New Art Gallery there is a permanent rotating display of various artworks artefacts called the Garman Ryan Collection. To cut a long story short there is a wooden bust of Christ by an unknown sculptor (believed to be French in origin) that always have to go and look at whenever I visit. I'm not sure if it's just the distortion of aging or the extranormal aspect of his expression, but there's something harrowing about it that moves me in a way that more sedate images of Christ fail to. I hope you aren't offended by this description BTG, but I find the best religious art is often the most surreal.

 

French%20Christ%20bust_zpsjmg2lf8d.png

When close friends speak ill of close friends

they pass their abuse from ear to ear

in dying whispers -

even now, when prayers are no longer prayed.

What sounds like violent coughing

turns out to be laughter.

Shuntarō Tanikawa

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Surreal is pretty common for most religious art, I agree... But then again, most of what's being dealt with in the art tends to be 'surreal'. (who wouldn't think that crucifying someone after beating him almost to death just because a crowd was paid off by a couple assholes wasn't surreal?)

bi ti ʤi ˈbulzaɪ

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