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I've been watch this video from Winston (serprntza)

and at first I was thinking, that yes, building an appartment complex just so you can tear it down, let's say, approximately 20 years later is a very scummy thing to do and bad for the environment, but then I started thinking I know nothing about tear down practices in the rest of the world.

How long does an appartment complex last in other places in the world?

In New York? (Manhatten, Bad Sty, Harlem, etc...)
In Chicago?
In Houston?
In London?
In Leeds?
In Paris?
In Leon?

In Frankfurt?
In Warsaw?
In Moscow?
In Kiev?

In New Delhi?

etc...

anyone got experience with this?

Burn the World!

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1 hour ago, kerdios said:

I've been watch this video from Winston (serprntza)

and at first I was thinking, that yes, building an appartment complex just so you can tear it down, let's say, approximately 20 years later is a very scummy thing to do and bad for the environment, but then I started thinking I know nothing about tear down practices in the rest of the world.

How long does an appartment complex last in other places in the world?

In New York? (Manhatten, Bad Sty, Harlem, etc...)
In Chicago?
In Houston?
In London?
In Leeds?
In Paris?
In Leon?

In Frankfurt?
In Warsaw?
In Moscow?
In Kiev?

In New Delhi?

etc...

anyone got experience with this?

The ones the Soviet Union built like 70 years ago are still being used in Eastern Europe. I'm in an early cold war era apartment building in NY that was built also 60 something years ago.

"Ich bin, ja, ja, Volkswagen narcoman"

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On 4/3/2021 at 8:38 AM, Im_IRS said:

The ones the Soviet Union built like 70 years ago are still being used in Eastern Europe. I'm in an early cold war era apartment building in NY that was built also 60 something years ago.

Colorado here... I've seen several that are still fully functioning from the mid-70's, despite not being very good quality constructions.

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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On 4/3/2021 at 9:11 AM, kerdios said:

I've been watch this video from Winston (serprntza)

and at first I was thinking, that yes, building an appartment complex just so you can tear it down, let's say, approximately 20 years later is a very scummy thing to do and bad for the environment, but then I started thinking I know nothing about tear down practices in the rest of the world.

How long does an appartment complex last in other places in the world?

In New York? (Manhatten, Bad Sty, Harlem, etc...)
In Chicago?
In Houston?
In London?
In Leeds?
In Paris?
In Leon?

In Frankfurt?
In Warsaw?
In Moscow?
In Kiev?

In New Delhi?

etc...

anyone got experience with this?

Too bloody long. I'm in NYC, so-

 

NYCHA projects have been around since the 40s, 50s, 60s.

 

Often what gets knocked down are townhouses and low-rises. Then, highrises and skyscrapers are built.

 

If it's over 10 stories, it's not very likely to come down any time soon, unless sold off to some rich developer. But if it's public housing, it's not coming down because the state doesn't want to build new housing for the residents within, even if it means the houses are messed up electricity wise, maintenance wise, living standard wise.

 

The plan back when they were made was sure, it'll be replaced in two generations, but that was the 80s, and the city was not in a good place in the 80s, so then maybe the 90s...then nothing happened...then the 00s....nothing happened....10s, now we're in the 20s. And all NYCHA can do is sell parts of their land off (there's a lot of empty garden space and so on) to developers to build on instead.

 

Instead of, ya know, using that to make temporary housing for the residents and knock down the old buildings and make modern new housing that can house more for better?

 

I mean I still support the selling off part of land anyway, but the city is basically praying that the building standards of the 40s is just good enough that they could squeeze out 100 years than 40 years out of these buildings.

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/nycha-to-sell-land-to-developers-to-raise-3-billion-for-fixes-11544652932

 

But, they're also already privatizing management of some units. I think the economics is that, surely, NYCHA thinks its too expensive to do in house...so they go to some new up-and-coming or small management agency and pay them less than what they would pay NYCHA and hope somehow that...what, the new parties want to look good performance wise and do more for less?

https://therealdeal.com/2020/02/13/nycha-inks-1-5b-deal-to-privatize-management-of-5900-units/

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On 9/5/2021 at 3:43 PM, Eshanas said:

...

Thanks for the verbose answer.

So are you actually saying you wish the NYCHA would do the same as China?

 

Another big headline about China lately is that it has banned videogames for anyone under the age of 18 except for the news hour (20-21:00) on Fridays to Sundays.
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/08/china-bans-online-gaming-for-minors-except-from-8-pm-9-pm-friday-to-sunday/

 

Burn the World!

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On 9/5/2021 at 10:31 PM, kerdios said:

Thanks for the verbose answer.

So are you actually saying you wish the NYCHA would do the same as China?

 

Another big headline about China lately is that it has banned videogames for anyone under the age of 18 except for the news hour (20-21:00) on Fridays to Sundays.
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/08/china-bans-online-gaming-for-minors-except-from-8-pm-9-pm-friday-to-sunday/

 

No?

 

How do you get that at all out my post?

 

I'm saying that development stalls here, and there's not enough replacing of older buildings as there should be.


Hong Kong went from low-rises to high-rises under British rule. macau the same under the portugese. It's a economic-will thing.

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