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Dead Game News: France vs. Valve + maybe the rest of the world

Dead Game News! I wasn’t even sure about making more of these, but this news was so big and there was so much to talk about here, I felt like I had to. I plan to make a followup video to the “Games as a service is fraud” video also, which this overlaps a bit with, but there was so much here I thought it was enough for a video in itself. It’s worth mentioning this did NOT delay the next Freeman’s Mind episode, the dialogue on that is done, I’m waiting for sound effects back on those, my guess is that will be out pretty soon. More videos coming!

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15 hours ago, Bilateralrope said:

Even if the owner of the account gives you permission to access it ?

 

Because giving permission for the new owner to access the account is an implicit part of any sale.

Yes, even then. Selling accounts is not currently legal in the USA.

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1 hour ago, BTGBullseye said:

Yes, even then. Selling accounts is not currently legal in the USA.

Could you cite the specific law or judicial precedent which makes it illegal ?

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On 9/30/2019 at 9:20 AM, BTGBullseye said:

Unfortunately, that will run exactly opposite existing USA law. You can actually get federal jail time for "sharing" an account like that. (if the federal government so chooses to target you thus)

Do you have a source for that?

 

16 hours ago, Bilateralrope said:

I don't see how that second hand activation fee can comply with the ruling. This court ruling is that you get to sell your copy of a game because you own that copy. The second hand activation fee is saying that there is part of your copy of the game that you do not own. What makes the content restricted by the second hand activation fee so special that it's exempt from the ruling ?

A second-hand activation fee doesn't say a part of the game isn't owned, it only says that the digital delivery service that a person wants to use a game with isn't owned by the purchaser of the second-hand game. A 2nd-hand activation fee also doesn't interfere with selling a game, as 2nd-hand activation only occurs after a game has already been successfully sold.

 

A game and the online servers a game can be used with are two distinct properties. The game is sold and bought separately from the online servers. So, currently, both before and after the Paris High Court's judgment, Valve's servers belong to Valve. If they want to charge to let a 2nd-hand license make use of their digital delivery services, then that's really up to them.

 

The same understanding regarding the distinction between already exists with multiplayer games, where a person buying a game that has a multiplayer component doesn't mean that they own the online component host's servers that the game needs to be played online. A company that runs online servers for a game is entitled to shut-down their servers whenever they choose, which leaves the part of a game that depended on those servers inoperable. If companies couldn't charge 2nd-hand activation fees for the right to use their digital delivery services, then they couldn't shut-down their multiplayer servers, either.

 

A host of a multiplayer game or component of a game is also entitled to deactivate a person's account on their servers for the same reason of their servers and their online service belonging exclusively to them and buying their game didn't transfer any ownership over the servers to whoever bought their game.

 

 

And this another reason why game ownership has to be defended: If digital platforms choose to close or restrict somebody's account or to refuse digital delivery of a game, if you own the game then you are entitled to use your license by other means, such as by cracking any DRM. But if you don't own the game, then companies can attack you for bypassing artificial DRM restrictions, claiming that playing the game apart from their permission through their approved methods is illegal and piracy.

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1 minute ago, Delicieuxz said:

Do you have a source for that?

 

A second-hand activation fee doesn't say a part of the game isn't owned, it only says that the digital delivery service that a person wants to use a game with isn't owned by the purchaser of the second-hand game. A 2nd-hand activation fee also doesn't interfere with selling a game, as 2nd-hand activation only occurs after a game has already been successfully sold.

 

A game and the online servers a game can be used with are two distinct properties. The game is sold and bought separately from the online servers. So, currently, both before and after the Paris High Court's judgment, Valve's servers belong to Valve. If they want to charge to let a 2nd-hand license make use of their digital delivery services, then that's really up to them.

 

You seem to be saying that what's special about the content behind the second hand activation fee is that the game developer decided to put it behind there. So what happens when they put most of the game behind it ?

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bilateralrope said:

You seem to be saying that what's special about the content behind the second hand activation fee is that the game developer decided to put it behind there. So what happens when they put most of the game behind it ?

I'm not meaning to suggest that there's any content locked behind a 2nd-hand activation fee. The 2nd-hand activation fee is to make use of a platform's digital delivery service to download and play the game through that platform.

 

Buying a game entitles a person to play the game. However, it doesn't entitle a person to get free services from a 3rd-party platform. Somewhat similarly, buying a car doesn't entitle the car-owner to free gas from gas stations. Yet, gas is needed to use the car.

 

With games, digital delivery from a platform might not be needed to use a game, if the game can be downloaded elsewhere. But in order to use a platform's services you'll become subject to their term for usage of their services (which games purchased through them are not a part of).

 

In the same way that games purchased through a platform are distinct from the platform's online services, having a right to play a purchased game is distinct from having a right to use a 3rd-party's own servers and services.

 

The idea that buying a game includes a right to use 3rd-party servers is associating the game ownership and the right to the game with the servers, just like when a platform or publisher tries to argue that people don't own their games. It's saying that companies don't own their own servers and service infrastructure, and is implying that buying a game means you also bought the 3rd-party servers the game can be used with or downloaded from and so have rights over those servers.

Edited by Delicieuxz

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5 hours ago, Bilateralrope said:

Could you cite the specific law or judicial precedent which makes it illegal ?

4 hours ago, Delicieuxz said:

Do you have a source for that?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Fraud_and_Abuse_Act

 

It's been abused for similar prosecutions previously, and I can guarantee that it will be abused again, especially with this ruling.

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