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Im playing on my laptop, and I wanted higher FPS on BC2. So I did a little OC and now I have a solid fps, but the gpu is at 83 celsius (I even have a cooling pad which Im using atm)

 

So is this too warm or what?

It was around 75-79 before so there isnt THAT big of a change temp wise..

 

I have googled it and people say different things everywhere, any ideas ?

 

Edit: Just noticed something strange, on Bad company 2 I get around 50 fps now, but on mass effect I have like 20.... What the hell?

 

Edit2: went from 600 coreclock mhz to 700

Went from 900 mhz memory clock to 1024

barely any difference in heat, but better fps in bc2

"Life sucks sober!"

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Mass Effect doesn't like OC since it causes it to heat up a lot... As for temps, what card are you using? If it's an AMD then those temps are about 5c too high... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 7XX series, it shouldn't go above 70c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 6XX series, then it shouldn't be running above 75c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 5XX series, then it shouldn't go over 80c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 4XX series, it's in the high-norms.

 

Easiest way to drop the temps a bit... Replace the stock thermal pads with thermal grease. (I recommend Prolimatech PK-1/PK-2/PK-3)

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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Mass Effect doesn't like OC since it causes it to heat up a lot... As for temps, what card are you using? If it's an AMD then those temps are about 5c too high... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 7XX series, it shouldn't go above 70c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 6XX series, then it shouldn't be running above 75c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 5XX series, then it shouldn't go over 80c when OCed... If it's an Nvidia GT/GTX 4XX series, it's in the high-norms.

 

Easiest way to drop the temps a bit... Replace the stock thermal pads with thermal grease. (I recommend Prolimatech PK-1/PK-2/PK-3)

 

I have an gt525m

goes to like 83 top, can barely notice it.

Its too high then?

 

Would resetting the clock improve on mass effect ?

Thanks for the help, appriciate it :)

"Life sucks sober!"

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Yeah, 83c for that card is way out of line... Resetting the OC would improve the performance in ME simply because it would run cooler.

 

I highly recommend just swapping out the thermal pads for thermal grease. (could drop it by as much as 10-15c depending on your processor)

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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Yeah, 83c for that card is way out of line... Resetting the OC would improve the performance in ME simply because it would run cooler.

 

I highly recommend just swapping out the thermal pads for thermal grease. (could drop it by as much as 10-15c depending on your processor)

In that case Ill try to get my hands on some thermal grease today, and drop the OC for now.

Thanks for the help!

"Life sucks sober!"

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83 is fine, don't bother messing with the heat sink out of the blue like that. You may do more damage. Had an old one that ran at 78 consistently. Trust me, until you start noticing weird stuff it isn't too hot yet.

 

Things you want to look out for that do indicate overheatig:

- the prime indicator are GPU artifacts, which are llitte white dots or lines that appear on your screen like static or snow

- Temporary forced downclocking, resulting in a sudden FPS decrease that will last until the temperature has gone down

- The computer will suddenly reboot or turn itself off

- voltage issues, because an overheated GPU will eventually draw more and more energy, leaving too little for other hardware components

 

 

Either way, it probably won't hurt to clean out the heat sink a bit. Leave the thermal grease alone unless you absolutely know what you're doing though.

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83 is fine, don't bother messing with the heat sink out of the blue like that. You may do more damage. Had an old one that ran at 78 consistently. Trust me, until you start noticing weird stuff it isn't too hot yet.

 

Things you want to look out for that do indicate overheatig:

- the prime indicator are GPU artifacts, which are llitte white dots or lines that appear on your screen like static or snow

- Temporary forced downclocking, resulting in a sudden FPS decrease that will last until the temperature has gone down

- The computer will suddenly reboot or turn itself off

- voltage issues, because an overheated GPU will eventually draw more and more energy, leaving too little for other hardware components

 

 

Either way, it probably won't hurt to clean out the heat sink a bit. Leave the thermal grease alone unless you absolutely know what you're doing though.

 

Ok, I have not experienced any of the things that you describe...

So I guess its fine? There has been no fps drops (except in mass effect, resetting the clock didnt do anything either) I get higher FPS everywhere else.

Havent seen any "snow" or any kind of screen tearing. Computer is running fine.

(forgive me for being the tech-noob that I am)

"Life sucks sober!"

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That's alright, we were all there once. :)

 

Yes it sounds fine then. Unless you have an actual break in the heatpipe (or more commonly, the air intake is stuffed with cat hair), the fps slowdown should only be temporary. It's probably something else causing that. Also, remember that it's summer time now and room temperature may be up a bit too.

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If you're running the temp over 80c for more than a few minutes it will quite literally burn thermal pads. Just an FYI from someone that has experience with lots of them.

 

78c =/= 83c

 

5c difference is huge when you're talking about PC part temps. Above 76c on that particular chip will chop it's lifetime down by 3/4. (lifetime being from first start to when the chip permanently dies)

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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I'm sorry, but that is complete nonsense. 3/4? Even if it did burn, you would be able to smell that in seconds. Temperature variations like that are quite normal, if only because of the change in seasons. Even if you run it at 90c the onboard fan will die before the card ever will. These things are lot more robust than you think.

 

I'm not saying that a computer doesn't require regular cleaning and maintenance. I'm just saying that taking off the heat sink and squirting on some new thermal paste is a lot more hardcore than most people should even attempt to consider. You'll get perfectly normal lifetime usuage out of a PC if you just treat it normally.

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Doublenature.. I'm sorry, this isn't helping you at all. When in doubt, do go for the extreme solution and apply some paste. But be exceedingly careful about it.

 

Ideally you don't fix things until they break (as in, you start seeing glitches). But it might put your mind at easy anyway. That's probably worth something more.

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I suggest replacing the grease with some normal quantity, they usually place half a package in there :D Use technical gas or isopropylalcohol to clean the old one and place just tiny film on the core.

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I'm sorry, but that is complete nonsense. 3/4?

You're proving that you aren't a tech professional... I am. (if you'd like, I can provides you my certification number for you to validate my credentials)

 

Even if it did burn, you would be able to smell that in seconds.

Couldn't with mine. Usually the thermal pads are not in an area that has extensive airflow, and normal computer part overheating/burning usually doesn't involve any odor or smoke when it's not caused by over-voltage. (unless you're getting really close and smelling for it)

 

Temperature variations like that are quite normal, if only because of the change in seasons. Even if you run it at 90c the onboard fan will die before the card ever will. These things are lot more robust than you think.

There are temperature ratings on chips for a reason... Past those temps you WILL destroy it with very light use. (fans don't die easily, they will outlast a system 99% of the time)

 

I'm not saying that a computer doesn't require regular cleaning and maintenance. I'm just saying that taking off the heat sink and squirting on some new thermal paste is a lot more hardcore than most people should even attempt to consider. You'll get perfectly normal lifetime usuage out of a PC if you just treat it normally.

He's talking about overclocking, he's not a complete amateur... Replacing a thermal pad with thermal grease is easy; a lot easier than most make it out to be. Try putting an amount of grease equivalent to a grain of rice, and let the heatsink spread it when you put it back on. Unless there is a gap between the heatsink and the chip, you shouldn't need more. If there is a gap, see if you can find some solid piece of copper, steel, or aluminum of the right thickness for a spacer, and put thermal grease on each side. If you can't find a spacer, just bridge the gap with thermal grease. (it's still better than the thermal pad if you get decent grease)

 

I highly recommend the Prolimatech brand of thermal greases. (they're inexpensive, and very effective)

 

Ideally you don't fix things until they break (as in, you start seeing glitches).

That is only if you're not planning on maintaining your system for a prolonged period, or if you take it to a shop to get all this done. (average users) If you plan on making your system last more than 2 years, (usually the time when you want to get an upgrade, and use the old system as a secondary or backup) then you'll fix things before they break so they don't break at all. (power users, gamers, people that don't like to spend hundreds to fix a problem that could have been prevented for $12)

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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It helps me when there are several people discussing, it creates a bigger perspective.

 

Im going to trust BTG on this one (hes proven several times on this forum that he knows his tech) and go buy some thermal grease (arctic-silver 5) on the 25th (when I get money).

 

Id rather be safe than sorry since I will only have my laptop this summer, and I wanna be able to play all my games, but I also dont want to ruin the thing.

Ill look up a guide (or ask in the store) on how you put on the grease so that I wont mess anything up. (I think I get the gist of it, but Id rather not mess it up)

 

I appreciate everyones help and insight on this.

(sorry about the late response, havent really had time to write it up)

"Life sucks sober!"

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hdHMsDXpvew

 

There's a decent guide... Not the best, a lot of junk you don't need before 5:00, but otherwise decent. Skip to 10:00 for the application itself, (just put about 50% more compound than he does in the video since it isn't quite enough) or if you just want to skip the detailed cleaning instructions.

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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hdHMsDXpvew

 

There's a decent guide... Not the best, a lot of junk you don't need before 5:00, but otherwise decent. Skip to 10:00 for the application itself, (just put about 50% more compound than he does in the video since it isn't quite enough) or if you just want to skip the detailed cleaning instructions.

A thousand thanks!

Now Ill just have to take the damn thing apart without breaking it.

Edit: Just realized that my laptop has an incredibly retarded placement of parts, this is gonna be fucking fun.

Edited by Guest (see edit history)

"Life sucks sober!"

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Shouldn't be hard... Most laptops require you to take out the keyboard to get to the heatsink, just an FYI. (Lenovo laptops have a nice design that puts everything that can be altered right there when you take off on back panel, so they're a lot easier to maintain) What brand PC are you using? (Dell make it as hard as possible to get to the CPU/GPU/heatsink)

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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(Dell make it as hard as possible to get to the CPU/GPU/heatsink)

Exactly.. Dell xps 15 l502x is what Ive got.

"Life sucks sober!"

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I had to take mine completely apart to clean the heatsinks. I have pictures and measurements of the fans and heatsink if you want to see it.

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Dell requires everything but the screen to be disassembled before the heatsink is accessible... Definitely look up a vid of someone doing it, or a walkthrough for your specific system if you don't have experience doing it yourself.

Don't insult me. I have trained professionals to do that.

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